Why is my betta fish obsessed with the filter?

In this post, we will answer the question “Why is my betta fish obsessed with the filter?”. We will also discuss the importance of an appropriate filtration system and how to distract your betta fish from the filter.

Why is my betta fish obsessed with the filter?

Betta fish prefer to congregate around the filter’s exit because the water flow rate there is particularly high there. A high flow rate indicates that the area receives more oxygen than the remainder of the tank and vice versa. The betta will be able to breathe more easily as a result. 

Swimming against a moderate current is another something Bettas like. For them, this is a form of entertainment in itself. If, on the other hand, the betta is having difficulty swimming straight, it indicates that the current battle is too much for him and that you must take action quickly.

Is the betta struggling to swim near the filter?

When the betta is swimming against the stream of the filter outlet, pay great attention to what it is doing. Is the fish swimming in a straight line? Is there any indication of a fight? 

If you see that the betta is having difficulty, this is an indicator that the filter flow rate is too high. You need to get it under control as soon as possible. Because most current filters are equipped with an adjustable knob, this is not a concern. 

Simply turn the knob until you achieve the desired flow rate. The question then becomes: what should you do if your filter does not have an adjustable knob? The best course of action will be to invest in a higher-quality filter with an adjustable knob.

In the event you do not have the necessary funds, there are certain measures you may do to dramatically reduce the flow rate.

Reducing the filter flow rate

Before we get into some of the do-it-yourself methods of lowering the filter flow rate, let me first point out that the best method of lowering the filter flow rate is to use the adjustment knob. The majority of filters these days are equipped with an adjustable knob. You may need to upgrade your filtration system if your filter does not meet these requirements. 

The first thing you should do is place a sponge over the filter’s input. This will help to remove any debris. The inlet of a filter is the entrance in the filter that allows water to enter the filter from the aquarium. If you can lessen the rate at which water enters the filter, the filter flow rate will be reduced automatically. 

Instead of a sponge, you can use a length of filter floss that has been cut into a tiny rectangle and wrapped around the entrance of the filter unit. It will also serve as an excellent mechanical filtering system. 

If the filter flow rate is still too high, place some filter floss within the filter chamber to reduce the flow rate further. The majority of HOBs have a partition built into their chamber. Using the divider, you may split the chamber into two sections. 

After collecting in the first chamber, the water is channelled into the second chamber through some sort of hole or notch at the top of the first chamber. The second chamber has a wide variety of filter materials of various sorts. 

Water entering the second chamber from the first chamber can be prevented from entering by placing some filter floss over the opening or notch in the first chamber. This second piece of filter floss will likewise act as a barrier in the water’s passage, reducing the pace at which it passes through the filter chamber. 

Before we get into some of the do-it-yourself methods of lowering the filter flow rate, let me first point out that the best method of lowering the filter flow rate is to use the adjustment knob. The majority of filters these days are equipped with an adjustable knob. You may need to upgrade your filtration system if your filter does not meet these requirements. 

The first thing you should do is place a sponge over the filter’s input. This will help to remove any debris. The inlet of a filter is the entrance in the filter that allows water to enter the filter from the aquarium. If you can lessen the rate at which water enters the filter, the filter flow rate will be reduced automatically. 

Instead of a sponge, you can use a length of filter floss that has been cut into a tiny rectangle and wrapped around the entrance of the filter unit. It will also serve as an excellent mechanical filtering system. 

If the filter flow rate is still too high, place some filter floss within the filter chamber to reduce the flow rate further. The majority of HOBs have a partition built into their chamber. Using the divider, you may split the chamber into two sections. 

After collecting in the first chamber, the water is channelled into the second chamber through some sort of hole or notch at the top of the first chamber. The second chamber has a wide variety of filter materials of various sorts. 

Water entering the second chamber from the first chamber can be prevented from entering by placing some filter floss over the opening or notch in the first chamber. This second piece of filter floss will likewise act as a barrier in the water’s passage, reducing the pace at which it passes through the filter chamber.

Does your betta need hiding places?

Having learned that hiding is a normal reaction in the case of betrayal, you can see why it is essential that you create safe hiding spots in your betta fish’s tank for him to feel secure. 

Keeping your pet in a naked tank that is devoid of any type of décor is cruel and should be avoided at all costs. Because Bettas are very clever fish, they require mental and physical activity to avoid becoming bored or anxious. The fish are also quite territorial and spend a significant amount of time cruising about their tank each day. Exploring caves, overhangs, and other potential hiding places is an important part of the territorial activity of wolves. 

Bettas in the wild are prey species who may be prey to larger fish and hence subject to assault. As a result, when the betta picks a territory, he must ensure that there are a sufficient number of spots where he may take refuge if the situation demands it. The fact that a pet betta will never be attacked or threatened in his tank is something he does not understand, thus it is vital to reassure him by placing several decorations that allow him to hide behind, as well as caverns and dense plants.

Betta hiding behind the filter unit

Seeing your betta huddled up behind the input filter or behind the outtake, although he has lots of other hiding spots available, there may be an issue with the water quality in your tank. Water that has been filtered is released from the filter unit, which is most likely why your fish is congregating there.

Betta hiding and not eating

Betta fish are notoriously hungry fish, so if your pet stops eating and also begins hiding, he’s likely suffering from a medical condition or illness. 

Make sure there is no ammonia or nitrite poisoning in the water tank by first testing it for these contaminants. It’s possible that your fish are sick even when the water parameters are perfect, such as ammonia and nitrite levels at zero and nitrate levels below 20ppm (parts per million). In the case of a long-term owner, the most probable source of the problem is a bacterial infection of some sort, which may be treated by adding an over-the-counter antibiotic to the tank water. If you have a new betta, the most likely cause of the problem is a parasite infestation. 

If, on the other hand, your pet is a newcomer, there might be a variety of health difficulties to contend with. If he’s a cup betta, he may be suffered from ammonia or nitrite poisoning, which might have left him with chronic health problems. Parasites, fungal or bacterial infections, as well as other illnesses, might be the source of the problem.

Flow rate             

Betta fish are not particularly good swimmers, especially if you have one of the long-finned kinds in your aquarium. As a result, if the flow from the filter pump causes a very strong current or a lot of water movement, your betta fish may take refuge behind some of the tank decorations or by hiding within a cave to avoid being buffeted around. 

If you are unable to change the flow rate on the filter, consider installing a redirector fitting, which will allow you to angle the flow and eliminate the disturbance that is now occurring. Alternatively, you may use pebbles, driftwood, or dense plants to slow the flow of water. Another good tip is to use a little piece of sponge to cover the end of the outlet’s connector. That should be adequate to reduce the flow’s power without jeopardising the system’s filtering capability.

Conclusion 

In this post, we answered the question “Why is my betta fish obsessed with the filter?”. We also discussed the importance of an appropriate filtration system and how to distract your betta fish from the filter.

If you have any thoughts or doubts, feel free to drop us a comment below!

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs): Why is my betta fish obsessed with the filter?

Why does my betta like to be near the filter? 

This is likely the most peaceful location in the tank. Because it might be difficult for them to swim against a strong water current, they like to congregate in areas where the current is less or non-existent. 

What is causing my betta fish to always swim behind the filter? 

Seeing your betta huddled up behind the input filter or behind the outtake, although he has lots of other hiding spots available, there may be an issue with the water quality in your tank. Water that has been filtered is released from the filter unit, which is most likely why your fish is congregating there. 

Is it possible for filters to be too powerful for bettas? 

When the current in your tank is too strong, your betta may appear to be straining to keep up with the current. It nearly appears as though he is being blown around by the wind. 

Do filters cause problems for betta fish? 

Using a filter is far more beneficial to your Betta. When utilising a filter in a Betta tank, the most difficult aspect is keeping track of the water flow. Bettas are not fond of fast-moving water and will have difficulty swimming in it. Depending on how powerful the filter is, it may even drag the Betta onto the intake tubing, causing the fish to drown. 

What is the best way to detect whether my betta is stressed? 

Swimming in an Odd Place: When fish are under stress, they frequently exhibit unusual swimming patterns. If your fish is swimming wildly without making any progress, falling to the bottom of his tank, rubbing himself against gravel or rocks, or locking his fins at his side, he may be suffering from severe stress and should be sent to the veterinarian immediately. 

What is causing my betta to be so close to the surface? 

A fish may hover at the surface of the water because it is attempting to take in more oxygen. It’s important to remember that fish breathe dissolved oxygen, not oxygen that has already been coupled with the water molecule. Naturally, the concentrations of dissolved oxygen are higher toward the surface of the water, where the interaction between air and water takes place.

References 

The beauty of the Betta https://www.petsit.com/facts-about-betta-fish

Bettas Need More Than Bowls. University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine.

Chewy Editorial. How to keep your Betta fish Healthy and Happy. https://be.chewy.com/how-to-keep-your-betta-fish-healthy-and-happy/

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