Is it normal for a dog to bleed after being spayed?

In this post we will talk about the post-surgical of dogs spayed. Is it normal to bleed after the dog is spayed? How long will it take for the wound to heal, and when the stitches can be removed? To answer these questions, let’s talk about castration surgery in female dogs and how post-surgery should be performed in these animals.

Is it normal for a dog to bleed after being spayed?

Yes, small bleeding can happen after spaying a female dog. During the incision, some vessels may be cut, leading to small bleeding after the surgery is completed.

As dogs are not extremely still after surgery, movement can lead to friction in the surgical wound that stimulates the release of small amounts of blood from injured blood vessels.

But when should I be concerned about bleeding after castration?

Female dogs should not experience excessive bleeding. Excessive bleeding can even be considered as hemorrhage, when no medical intervention occurs, it can lead to hypovolemic shock and even the animal’s death.

Bleeding after castration can have several causes, one of them is genetic diseases, deficiencies of some proteins, changes in clotting factors and infectious diseases that change the dogs’ platelets. To avoid this, blood tests should be performed before any surgical procedure.

Another factor that can lead to heavy bleeding is the rupture of large vessels during surgery, or the loosening of the ovarian pedicle suture. These surgical errors can result in heavy bleeding during and even after surgery. If excessive bleeding is observed, the animal should be treated urgently by a veterinarian.

Heavy bleeding can also occur when female dogs do not wear cones or surgical clothing to prevent the animal from encountering the surgical wound. So, the dog can remove the stitches and further damage the surgical wound, leading to heavy bleeding. The animal must be taken to a veterinary for wound cleaning and new stitches.

How is the castration procedure performed in female dogs?

In female dogs, the surgery is called an ovariohysterectomy, where the ovary and uterus are removed. In this way, the production of sex hormones such as estrogen and progesterone will be suppressed, preventing the animal from going into heat.

How is the post-surgery in female dogs?

The post-surgery period in females is usually easy, but the female dog should avoid physical activities in the first few days. Complete healing of the region can occur between 10 and 15 days after castration.

Every day, tutors must remove the bandage to clean the suture with the help of a product indicated by the veterinarian. In some cases, the dressing will need to be redone.

While the animal is with the sutures, it is recommended that it remain as a cone. The cone prevents the dog from removing the stitches prematurely and prevents the dog from coming into contact with the surgical wound that can become contaminated and infected.

After 10 to 15 days of surgery, the dog should visit the veterinarian for clinical evaluation of the wound and removal of the stitches. Only after removing the stitches can the dog be without the cone.

Why should I spay a female dog?

The female dog castration can have great benefits such as:

  • Population control;
  • Prevention of breast tumor cases;
  • Prevention of genital tract diseases;
  • Behavioral changes.

Population control

Castrated dogs do not reproduce, thus helping with population control. Abandoned dogs can benefit more from this practice, while tutor dogs will never reproduce even if they are not castrated, requiring an evaluation with the veterinarian to make the best decision for the animal’s health.

Population control is very necessary due to the large number of abandoned dogs. Abandoned dogs without castration can generate many puppies and thus only exacerbating the problem by increasing the population of abandoned dogs. That’s why it’s important to perform castration, especially in abandoned dogs.

Tumor prevention

In female dogs, spaying can reduce the chances of breast tumors. Some breeds, especially small breeds, are more predisposed to develop breast tumors. For these breeds, consultation with a veterinarian for sparing is indicated.

Prevention of genital tract diseases

In female dogs, diseases such as pyometra, endometritis, uterine tumors, ovarian cysts and others are no longer a concern. In the surgery, the uterus and ovaries are removed, so the animal will not have any of these diseases.

 Behavioral changes

Behavioral changes

Castrated dogs tend to be less energetic so they reduce physical activity and play. But not all dogs are like that, some continue to show active behavior.

Therefore, after castration, the use of food for neutered dogs is indicated, thus avoiding the animal’s weight gain associated with the reduction of physical activities.

Dog behavior can be learned at the puppy stage and even at puberty. These learned behaviors can remain even after castration. Castration can reduce some behaviors in some dogs and even solve unwanted problems, but castration is not a sure solution to dogs behavior problems.

Conclusion

With this post we learned that small bleeding is normal after spaying female dogs. And that we should seek help from the veterinarian if more intense bleeding is observed. Finally, we talk about the post-surgical of spaying female dogs and the time for healing and removal of the stitches.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs): Is it normal for a dog to bleed after being spayed?

How long until the complete healing of the wound of the dog castration?

The postoperative period in females is usually easy, but the bitch should avoid physical activities in the first few days. Complete healing of the region can occur between 10 and 15 days after castration.

How does the female castration procedure work?

In female dogs, the surgery is called an ovariohysterectomy, where the ovary and uterus are removed. In this way, the production of sex hormones such as estrogen and progesterone will be suppressed, preventing the animal from going into heat. 

What are the benefits of spaying a female dog?

The benefits of neutering a female dog are:

  • Population control;
  • Prevention of breast tumor cases;
  • Prevention of reproductive system pathologies such as pyometra, endometritis, among others.

References 

de la Riva, G. T., Hart, B. L., Farver, T. B., Oberbauer, A. M., Messam, L. L. M., Willits, N., & Hart, L. A. (2013). Neutering dogs: effects on joint disorders and cancers in golden retrievers. PloS one, 8(2), e55937.   

Hart, B. L., Hart, L. A., Thigpen, A. P., & Willits, N. H. (2016). Neutering of German Shepherd Dogs: associated joint disorders, cancers and urinary incontinence. Veterinary Medicine and Science, 2(3), 191-19   

McGreevy, P. D., Wilson, B., Starling, M. J., & Serpell, J. A. (2018). Behavioural risks in male dogs with minimal lifetime exposure to gonadal hormones may complicate population-control benefits of desexing. PLoS One, 13(5), e0196284.   

McGuire, B. (2019). Effects of gonadectomy on scent-marking behavior of shelter dogs. Journal of Veterinary Behavior, 30, 16-24.    

Reichler, I. M. (2009). Gonadectomy in cats and dogs: a review of risks and benefits. Reproduction in Domestic Animals, 44, 29-35. 

Vanderstichel, R., Forzan, M. J., Perez, G. E., Serpell, J. A., & Garde, E. (2015). Changes in blood testosterone concentrations after surgical and chemical sterilization of male free-roaming dogs in southern Chile. Theriogenology, 83(6), 1021-1027.  

Witsberger, T. H., Villamil, J. A., Schultz, L. G., Hahn, A. W., & Cook, J. L. (2008). Prevalence of and risk factors for hip dysplasia and cranial cruciate ligament deficiency in dogs. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 232(12), 1818-1824.

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