Is your Dog hyperventilating? (5 important things you need to know)

Your dog hyperventilating is one of the conditions that can make you worry a lot about your pet dog, especially in pups. In this blog, we will cover the signs, causes, treatment as well as the different conditions of dog hyperventilating. So, here we go

Dog hyperventilating

Dog hyperventilating is a condition where a dog undergoes shallow and rapid breathing. During this condition the dog is unable to use oxygen for the essential and normal physiological functions such as normal breathing and muscle movements, the levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide may alter leading the dog to hyperventilate.

If you see your dog hyperventilating the first and foremost thing that you have to do is the confirmation. In this blog, we will help you identify the definite signs that your dog is hyperventilating.

Dog hyperventilating is related to some most common causes that will be discussed later in the blog as well as the most beneficial tips for you to manage and treat your dog undergoing hyperventilation.

Dog hyperventilating: Signs

For the normal functioning of a living body, oxygen is the most necessary component. Just like humans if dogs are not able to breathe properly will undergo serious consequences leading to severe complications and in some cases even death

Following are some most common and important signs and symptoms that you must know to identify your dog hyperventilating

  • Rapid or fast breathing
  • Too much panting
  • Excessive drooling
  • Open-mouth breathing
  • Increased and rapid heart rate
  • Snorting
  • Wheezing
  • Weakness
  • Lethargy
  • Blue gums indicating oxygen deprivation
  • Collapse or unconsciousness

So if you see your dog hyperventilating, must confirm the above-mentioned signs and go for the treatment as soon as possible, because if these signs are left ignored and untreated they may lead to severe complications even death.

Dog hyperventilating: Causes

Dog hyperventilating is associated with some most common causes that you surely want to know if you are a pet owner of a dog, especially a pup.

Dog hyperventilating:  Heatstroke

If you made your dog undergo strenuous exercise or extreme physical activity on a very hot day or temperature you will see your dog breathing through the open mouth and panting. Panting is the way dogs cool off their body temperatures by opening their mouths and keeping their tongues out. 

Due to heatstroke and overheating the dog will try to pant rapidly leading to rapid breathing to take in as much air as possible to cool off the heated body temperature leading to the dog hyperventilating.

Don’t panic in such a scenario, just try to cool your dog as much as you can and even after doing that you see your dog hyperventilating just go to your vet as soon as possible to prevent any serious complications, such as heart failure or tissue necrosis.

Dog hyperventilating: Respiratory Conditions

Different respiratory conditions can expose your dog to hyperventilation such as asthma, bronchopneumonia, TB, kennel cough, allergies etc. These conditions are common in dogs especially young pups who have not yet built a strong and competent immune system.

Nervous conditions leading to muscular spasm of the respiratory system can also make your dog hyperventilating to compensate for the oxygen deprivation your dog is going through.

The nervous complication of the respiratory system may lead to difficulty in breathing, it may include a non-receptive trachea or even lungs.

Muscular weakness can also lead to the respiratory complications that lead to hyperventilation such as the collapse of the windpipe or diaphragmatic injuries that require immediate emergency help of your vet, to save the precious life of your dog.

Dog hyperventilating: Stress 

Dogs are friendly living beings that can undergo stress easily. Stress can be of any sort, it could be a psychological trauma leading to anxiety or stress due to over physical activities or temperature such as heat or cold stress.

Stress can make your dog breathe rapidly along with excessive drooling and panting lead to your dog hyperventilating badly. Emotional stress is seen mostly among dogs who have a shy and cowardly nature, in that cases remove the dog from the stressful environment as soon as possible to prevent your dog from hyperventilation.

You can use anxiety medication recommended by your vet in case of emotional stress such as anxiety that your dog undergoes from. If hyperventilating continues it is better to call your vet to prevent severe complications from happening.

Dog hyperventilating: Metabolic acidosis

The blood maintains a neutral pH to undergo normal functioning of the body, in any case, the ph of the blood is altered. It may lead to severe complications such as your dog hyperventilating.

Metabolic acidosis is a condition where the pH of the blood becomes acidic rather than neutral. It may be caused due to high ingestion of acidic diet or other systemic disorders such as liver dysfunctioning or kidney complications.

The most typical signs of metabolic acidosis along with your dog hyperventilating include vomiting, diarrhoea and lethargy. If you suspect your dog with metabolic acidosis run to your vet immediately. 

Dog hyperventilating: Reverse sneezing 

A reverse sneeze usually happens when a dog takes long and rapid breaths characterized by snorting. This usually occurs with flat-faced dogs having short noses such as bulldogs, pugs or Boston terriers.

If you see your dog hyperventilating because of reverse sneezing you should not be worried much as it is not a serious condition, but if you see your pup undergoing some serious complications along with reverse sneezing such fainting or choking, run to your vet immediately.

Dog hyperventilating: Treatment

Dog hyperventilating is a serious concern about your dog’s health. In order to treat your dog, you need to visit a licensed doctor of veterinary medicine (DVM).

You can also help your dog by removing him or her from stressful conditions. You can help your dog cool down by spraying cool water on him or her in case of heatstroke. You can also use anxiety medication prescribed by your vet in case of your dog’s stress-based hyperventilation.

The medication that your vet will most probably recommend to your dog will include bronchodilators such as antihistamines in case of respiratory system complications such as allergy or asthma as well as anti-anxiety medication to calm your dog. 

Dog hyperventilating: Different conditions

You may come across different conditions in which you can observe your dog hyperventilating such as:

Dog hyperventilating through the nose

As mentioned earlier, one of the main causes of your dog hyperventilating includes reverse sneezing in which your dog takes long and rapid breaths characterized by snorting. So if you see your dog hyperventilating through his or her nose, it would be probably because of the reverse sneezing.

 

Dog hyperventilating after exercise

You can observe your dog undergo hyperventilation after extreme physical exercises especially in case of hot temperatures leading to heatstroke. 

Dog is hyperventilating and shaking

If you see your dog hyperventilating and shaking as well it might be the sign of something serious such as internal injury or other systemic complications such as renal failure or gastric tract injuries. So if you see your dog hyperventilating and shaking, run to your vet immediately.

 

Dog hyperventilating pain

If you see your dog having pain in the thoracic region or simply in its chest or neck it might be due to some serious injury or choking. Choking is common in small animals such as dogs and cats, the choking leads to difficulty breathing and hyperventilation. So if you see your dog having pain and hyperventilating run to your vet as soon as possible.

 

Dog hyperventilating and vomiting

This usually occurs in older dogs undergoing laryngeal or esophageal paralysis this also may include conditions such as poisoning or ingestion of some toxic metals or drugs. Metabolic conditions such as metabolic acidosis can also lead to your dog hyperventilating and vomiting.

 

Dog hyperventilating at rest

Dog hyperventilating at rest can include various factors such as any adverse drug reaction, reverse sneezing or anxiety. Most of the factors that lead your dog to hyperventilate should be checked immediately by your vet.

Dog hyperventilating at resting

 

Dog hyperventilating and drooling

Excessive drooling with hyperventilation may occur as a consequence of poisoning. When a dog pants, drooling is common but too much drooling along with hyperventilation can be because of severe stress or poisoning. In this case, you should immediately consult your vet to save your dog from any further complications.

 

Dog hyperventilating after surgery

Usually, if you see your dog hyperventilating after surgery it might be because of some side effects caused by the anaesthetic medication used during the surgery. I f the hyperventilation goes serious, call your vet to treat it. Taking care of hyperventilation of your dog after surgery is one of the most important post-operative protocols. 

Conclusion :

So far we have discussed what is Dog hyperventilation, important signs of dog hyperventilation as well as different causes, treatment and different conditions of dog hyperventilation.

We came to know that dog hyperventilating is a condition which left unnoticed can lead to different complications that can lead to even death. So, if you see your dog hyperventilating run to your vet immediately.

Also, feel free to ask anything about a dog hyperventilating in the comment section below.

FAQs: Dog hyperventilating 

How do I know if my dog is hyperventilating?

Following are some most common and important signs and symptoms that you must know to identify if your dog is hyperventilating

  • Rapid or fast breathing
  • Too much panting
  • Excessive drooling
  • Open-mouth breathing
  • Increased and rapid heart rate
  • Snorting
  • Wheezing
  • Weakness

Why is my dog breathing fast while resting?

Your dog breathing fast while resting can be multifactorial; it could be because of stress, anxiety, other underlying systemic malfunctions or metabolic diseases such as metabolic acidosis. If you are persistently watching your dog breathing fast while resting you should consult your vet immediately. 

Why don’t dogs hyperventilate when they pant?

Dogs don’t hyperventilate while panting because panting is a thermoregulatory phenomenon. When dogs pant they focus on cooling off their raised body temperatures and starts deeper breathing including deeper parts of their lungs that might be the possible reason why dogs don’t hyperventilate when they pant.

Why is my dog hyperventilating and shaking?

Your dog hyperventilating and shaking as well might be the sign of something serious such as internal injury or other systemic complications such as renal failure or gastric tract injuries. So if you see your dog hyperventilating and shaking, run to your vet immediately.

How can I slow down my dog’s breathing?

You can slow down your dog’s breathing, by removing him or her from stressful conditions. You can help your dog cool down by spraying cool water on him or her in case of heatstroke. You can also use anxiety medication prescribed by your vet in case of your dog’s stress-based hyperventilation.

Why does my dog pant heavily at night?

Your dog panting heavily at night can be multifactorial; it could be because of hot room temperature or stress, anxiety or any other underlying systemic malfunctions. You should consult your vet immediately to diagnose it properly.

References:

https://www.pethonesty.com/blogs/blog/dog-hyperventilating

https://wagwalking.com/symptom/why-is-my-dog-hyperventilating

https://www.thesprucepets.com/why-does-my-dog-hyperventilate-when-excited-3385026#:~:text=It%20is%20not%20usually%20of,cool%20it’s%20body%20with%20panting

https://www.quora.com/How-do-you-stop-a-dog-from-hyperventilating

https://pets.webmd.com/dogs/dog-panting-heavily

https://www.azcentral.com/story/claythompson/2014/04/14/panting-dogs-hyperventilating-humor/7576585/

Hi, I am Martin, I am a pet lover! I own a Golden retriever and a Long-eared Owl. They keep me company & I often had questions about them which I couldn't find answers for online. I put this hub together for people like me & you.

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